Downtown Flooding

In case you missed it, the rain we had on Tuesday really socked Downtown Frederick:

Some businesses also sustained major damage:

Berberich estimated he lost close to $50,000 of inventory, including records, display cases and stereo equipment. His store, along with those on either side — Whidden Willow and an office of Verizon Wireless — were hardest hit by the overnight rainstorm, although others also reported minor damage, said Kara Norman, executive director of the Downtown Frederick Partnership.

Berberich said the shop’s location — below street level in a valley, with Patrick Street sloping upward on either side — made him and his neighbors prime targets for the torrential water that accumulated Tuesday night.

If you want to help contact the Downtown Frederick Partnership or make a donation to the shops directly effected.

Three New Niche Shops for Frederick

Three new establishments have recently opened up in Frederick:

Glory Doughnuts

Glory Doughnuts

Hand Forged. Small Batch. Vegan. Local. Organic. Doughnuts and Fritters rotating daily along with an all day breakfast menu!

Location: 244 E Church St


Crisafulli’s Cheese Shop

cheese

Crisafulli’s Cheese Shop combines both food and fun, offering the finest selection of cheese to Frederick, Maryland, and the surrounding Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

Location: 8 E. 2nd Street, Suite 104


Gravel & Grind

gravel-grind

Gravel & Grind is a bike shop with an artisan coffee shop located in historic downtown Frederick, MD.

Location: 124 S. Carroll St.


Anyone try these places out yet? Do you have any new businesses to add to the list?

Two Paws Up Closes

Sad news:

A colorful landmark in downtown Frederick has closed its doors.

Two Paws Up, a pet store known for its bright frontage and doghouse on the street, is closed.

Opened in 2004 by Allison Levitt, the shop had become a popular place for pet owners. It offered food, treats and pet spa services.

The shop was closed Thursday, and there was no note on the door.

Shopping Small in Frederick

Stephanie Yamkovenko was nice enough to share a guide to her favorite places to shop dowtown. Just in time for Three Saturdays in December.

I was trying to think of some of my favorite local Frederick shops that aren’t downtown. If The Shoe Fits comes to mind, but I’m blanking on others. Any suggestions on where to spend some hard earned holiday cash at local shops in the Frederick area would be great, just add them in the comments.

Gmart Closes

From the Frederick News-Post:

Store management could not be reached for comment Thursday, but rumors of the store’s closing had been circulating for weeks.

Management kept the news close to its chest and initially told The Frederick News-Post the store was not closing. Some customers said they had heard the same, while others heard it would be reopened under new management.

Richard Griffin, director of economic development for the city of Frederick, said his office heard a few weeks ago the store was undergoing management changes, but nothing about closing.

Retailers are not required to report going out of business, he added.
“It is unfortunate, however. They were only here for a short time,” he said. “We had hoped that they would be a longtime anchor on the Golden Mile.”

The store opened more than a year ago in September.

Frederick a "Mini-D.C."

The Washington Post did an article about revitalized downtowns of the region. Much of the focus was on Frederick’s Downtown:

Many of the same forces fueling Washington’s renaissance are driving a small-city boom regionally and nationally. From the historic cities of Alexandria, Annapolis and Leesburg to the newer Metro-centric communities of Bethesda and Clarendon, the desire to live within walking distance of restaurants, bars, theaters and parks has revitalized once-withering downtowns, according to demographers and real estate experts.

Elsewhere, examples of the boom abound: Evanston outside Chicago, Pasadena outside Los Angeles, West Palm Beach outside Miami, said Christopher B. Leinberger, a George Washington University business professor who has studied the trend for years.

In the Washington region, few places have benefited more from the phenomenon than downtown Frederick, where a flourishing restaurant, bar and art scene has transformed the 18th century county seat into a mini-D.C. In the past five years, the city has added 40 businesses to its eclectic downtown, Frederick officials say, and demand for houses in the most walkable parts of the city has pushed up median home prices.

The article also points out some of the things blocking Downtown Frederick and it’s regional counterparts from more growth:

Big housing complexes, large retailers and especially plentiful job opportunities are often scarce in small cities. The regulations that mandate architectural preservation in historic downtowns can also make development difficult or cost-prohibitive.

If you can get through the ad blockade on the Post site go read the article than come back and discuss. It’d be interesting to see what you all think about it.